"Our success is not because of the coverage we offer. It's because of the people who write the policies."


Mobile/Manufactured Home/Park Model

Territory

  • California and Arizona

  Service

  • Online web rater, direct bill
  • Payment plan available
  • Commission 15% new, 15% renewal

  Guidelines

  • $20,000-$300,000 limits available
  • 120% Extended Replacement
  • Liability up to $500,000
  • Protection class 8/9
  • Seasonal with Occasional Rental
  • Vacant Program DPI – VMM included
  • Rental – Replacement Cost Available

  Optional Coverages

  • Flood Coverage
  • Builder’s Risk – (COC)
  • Earthquake

Contact: Mobile Home Department

949-488-2255 / 800-488-4096 / Fax: 949-488-2259

Send submission to: hfine@kinginsuranceca.com

Mobile Home Insurance

mobile home insurance

A mobile home and manufactured home are different entities. A mobile home is usually constructed prior to June 1976. Homes constructed post June 1976 are almost always categorically known as manufactured homes, meeting FHA certification requirements, and come with attached metal certification tags. Mobile homes permanently installed on owned land are rarely mortgageable, whereas FHA code manufactured homes are mortgageable through VA, FHA, and FNMA. Mobile homes come in two major sizes, single-wides and double-wides. Single-wides are 18 feet (5.5 m) or less in width and 90 feet (27 m) or less in length and can be towed to their site as a single unit. Double-wides are 20 feet (6.1 m) or more wide and are 90 feet (27 m) in length or less and are towed to their site in two separate units, which are then joined together. Triple-wides and even homes with four, five, or more units are also built, although not as commonly.

Mobile homes are often sited in land lease communities known as trailer parks (also ‘trailer courts’, ‘mobile home parks’, ‘mobile home communities’, ‘manufactured home communities’, ‘factory built home communities’ etc), these communities allow home owners to rent space on which to place a home. In addition to providing space, the site often provides basic utilities such as water, sewer, electricity, or natural gas and other amenities such as garbage removal, community rooms, pools, and playgrounds.

There are over 38,000 trailer parks in the United States ranging in size from 5 to over 1,000 home sites. Although most parks appeal to meeting basic housing needs, some communities specialize towards certain segments of the market. One subset of mobile home parks, retirement communities, restrict residents to those age 55 and older. Another subset of mobile home parks, seasonal communities, are located in popular vacation destinations or are used as a location for summer homes.

Difference from Modular homes

Because of similarities in the manufacturing process, some companies build both types in their factories. Modular homes are transported on flatbed trucks rather than being towed, and lack axles and an automotive-type frame. However, some of these homes are towed behind a semi-truck or toter on a frame similar to that of a trailer. The home is usually in two pieces and is hauled by two separate trucks. Each frame has five or more axles, depending on the size of the home. Once the home has reached its location, the axles and the tongue of the frame are then removed, and the home is set on a concrete foundation by a large crane.

Both styles are commonly referred to as factory built housing, although that term’s technical use is restricted to a class of homes regulated by the Federal National Mfd. Housing Construction and Safety Standards Act of 1974.

Park Models

Park models are transportable and primarily designed for long-term or permanent placement at a destination where an RV or mobile home is allowed. When set up, park models are connected to the utilities necessary to operate home-style fixtures and appliances.

In the United States, park models must remain under 400 square feet to qualify as a recreational vehicle under federal and state laws. In Canada, park models must remain under 540 square feet in order to qualify as a recreational vehicle. Over that size they would be considered a manufactured home and subject to different taxes and regulations. Many units feature slide-out or tip-out bays, which collapse into the unit for travel, and then expand outward when parked to increase overall living space. All floor plans are designed to remain under that limit when adding bays. If buyers want to stretch a plan, then the width may need to be narrowed. If they want to widen a plan, then the length has to be shortened.

A park model usually has steel tie-down straps for attachment to ground anchors. These are often required to satisfy local zoning and/or mobile home park regulations.